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The Florida Department of Health works to protect, promote & improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county & community efforts.

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Know Your Heart Numbers

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February is American Heart Month! With so many Valentine’s hearts on display, it’s time to focus on your heart, commit to a healthier lifestyle, and help fight the number one killer in Florida and the nation: heart disease. According to the CDC, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and smoking can lead to heart disease, and about half of all Americans either have one of these health issues or smoke.

The World Health Organization made an announcement Feb. 11 that the official name for the illness caused by the new coronavirus (previously known as 2019 Novel Coronavirus or 2019-nCoV) is now COVID-19.

The Florida Department of Health (Department) is working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to closely monitor the current outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus and is actively working to ensure that the most up-to-date CDC guidance is quickly and accurately disseminated to local partners.

Full Story on FloridaHealth.gov

Hepatitis A is a vaccine-preventable liver disease. While normally not fatal, persons with chronic liver or kidney disease or compromised immune systems are more likely to experience a severe illness, leading to liver failure and possible death.

The symptoms of hepatitis A can include: fever, jaundice (yellow skin and eyes), tiredness, loss of appetite, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine, diarrhea, and gray clay-colored stool. If you have symptoms of hepatitis A, you should visit your health care provider for evaluation. People that are exposed to hepatitis A may be given vaccine or immune globulin within 14 days of exposure to prevent infection.

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